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French Lop Rabbits

Breed Rating (10 reviews)

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History

This breed originates from France and was created during the middle of the nineteenth century. It was introduced into the UK primarily as a meat rabbit but in 1965, the French Lop was exhibited for the first time to this day, they remain a very popular exhibition and pet rabbit.

The French Lop is a very large rabbit, weighing more than 10lb (4.5kg) with lop ears and an almost cubic appearance with a short thickset body and large head. The front legs are short and straight and the hind legs are carried parallel to the body.

Behaviour

As a large rabbit, the French Lop can be quite placid but is as likely to develop actual behaviour problems as other breeds. Their size dictates confident handling and they will require a large hutch/run to move around freely. They are not the rabbit for small children or people that have limited space, although they can live in the house as a house pet.

Varieties

Black, White, Brown, Blue, Agouti, Chinchilla, Opal. Sooty Fawn, Siamese Sable, Orange, Fawn, Steel and Butterfly (white on underbelly, chest, feet and nose, leaving one of the above colours on the back, ears and a distinctive butterfly marking on the head).

Status

Common

Latest Reviews For French Lops (5 of 10)

  • 5 Star: 10 (10)
  • 4 Star: 0 (0)
  • 3 Star: 0 (0)
  • 2 Star: 0 (0)
  • 1 Star: 0 (0)
Average Rating:

           (Based on 10 reviews)

Write Review

           A beautiful rabbit

- Dorothy, 10 May 2013

My french lop rabbit is now 9 years old. She is blind in one eye (after an accident) and probably has a cateract in her other eye but she still hops around the garden. She lived with a male rabbit until he died, we tried to bond her with another male but she despised him (and he died of old age soon after) so she now lives in the garden with four chickens. They seem to get on very well. Now she is older, she has slowed down and she sleeps in the kitchen at night, as it is warmer and safer for her but she will still run out in the snow. She is lovely but slightly indifferent to affection. She has always needed to be groomed and you can pull the excess hair off her back but she doesn't mind. She has never liked being picked up but it is the only way to catch her at night-time. She is very docile and easy going but tends to avoid children.


          

- Sofia, 21 April 2013

These rabbits are beautiful and great childrens pets and i recommend them to anyone needing company!


           My beast!

- Francesca, 30 January 2013

I've got a year old french lopped called Fudge. I was told the breed was a dwarf lopped and he just kept on growing, now he weighs a whopping 14lbs :) He loves attention especially when he nudges your ankles for strokes. He likes being picked for a only a couple of minutes then he's had enough. The colouring is Agouti and EVERYONE falls in love with him because of his size. He is a big boy. Fudge adores his brocolli - took him 2 minutes to much his way through a handful of the stuff. He is house trained and he marks everything new smelling to him even though he's had the snip! I can't imagine my live without him!


          

- Sara, 07 March 2012

I have a french lop he is 5 months and called Buster. He lives indoors and has loads of personality, he loves hoping around my leg and chasing me.He is so cute and hansome however hes quite independant and does not like to cuddle.When he chills out on the floor he loves me to kiss him and pay him attendtion.


           Frech lops are gentle giants

- Marie, 03 June 2011

I had a French lop a few years ago. He was lovely, very gentle and adored being cuddled and groomed. They are extremely large animals, only get if an adult will take full responsibility. a Child could not carry an adult french lop. I called mine Digby. I wouldn't have them in the house as they moult so much, twice a year. They need grooming. Free roam of the garden is best with a large shed to house them. They are a fabulous pet.

 
 
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