Dutch Bantam Chickens

Breed Rating (16 reviews)

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History

The Dutch bantam or De Hollandse Krielan has been in existence for a long time and first appeared in Britain in the late 1960s. They are upright little birds with short backs, and a high full breast. The wings are fairly large and long and are carried close to the body. The tail is full and well spread with well developed sickles. The comb is single with five serrations and the beak is short, strong and slightly curved. Ear lobes are small and oval shaped while the wattles are short and round. They have four toes and the legs are unfeathered.

Behaviour

Egg production is limited to the summer months and eggs take only 20 days to hatch instead of the usual 21 days for other breeds. They are good layers, good setters, and good broodies. Because of their small size, Dutch females are only capable of covering a small clutch of eggs. The chicks are very active indeed and need good quality chick crumbs to keep up with their appetites. They usually need these for longer than the usual 8 weeks and also require shallow drinkers to prevent them from drowning if they happen to fall in. Dutch bantams are jaunty little birds and need to be protected from the winter weather. They also need good fencing as they are good fliers.

Varieties

Gold partridge, silver partridge or duckwing, yellow partridge or duckwing, blue silver partridge or duckwing, blue yellow partridge or duckwing, blue partridge (blue-red), red shouldered white (pyle), cuckoo partridge (crele), cuckoo, black, white, blue and lavender (pearl grey)

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Latest Reviews For Dutch Bantams (5 of 16)

  • 5 Star: 16 (16)
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  • 2 Star: 0 (0)
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Average Rating:

           (Based on 16 reviews)

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           Brilliant fertile rate

- Arnie, 09 June 2013

I have just got 7 silver duck wing Dutch bantam eggs from my friend and I have put them in the incubator, I have just candled them and 6 out of 7 have got something in. Awesome


           Very lovely bantams

- Carlton, 04 May 2013

These are lovely chickens to have pecking around your garden. Ideal for small or large gardens. They lay an egg a day each. Very pleased with this breed.


           Golden dutch

- Joe, 01 September 2011

The golden dutch chicks are no bigger than a pidgin and lay eggs every over day and love to be out side in the garden , golden dutch chicks can fly but only short distance.


           Noel, Poole, 13/06/11

- Noel, 13 June 2011

I have a pair of gold partridge which have just had one chick andI fully intend to increase the flock. I let them roam freely around the garden where they seem to thrive. They seem to have sorted out the problem with snails eating all my plants and they never damage anything. They are very friendly and always cluck around as I tend the garden, great characters with lots of personality. Extremely easy pets to care for and inexpensive too. If living in close proximity to neighbours who may not appreciate early morning fanfare avoid having a cockerel as they tend to be quite vocal, (personally I enjoy it !)..P.S. The chicks are adorable !


           Must have!

- Rosa, 01 June 2011

I have a pair of dutch bantams they are a must have, cute, friendly and lay small but very tasty eggs! They are garden friendly and squeak not cluck. Recently the female had been sitting on 6 eggs after approximately 20 days one hatched, surprisingly because i'm not experienced being only my second hatching. With only one of them hatching I was quite disappointed I suspected that the rest was not fertilised. The male is very protective and the hen a very good mother. The chick is very small and very confident I am not sure what gender it is yet but I am sure he\she would not mind being called may. Love this pair!

 

Breeders Clubs for Dutch bantams

Dutch Bantam Club

E-mail: christine@compton3.plus.com

Website: www.dutchbantamclub.org/

Tel: 01962 774476

To view all chicken breed clubs click here.

 
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