Akita

History

The Akita was developed in Japan, from tough ancestral hunting dogs going back many centuries. Today there are two separate varieties of the Akita: the Japanese "Akita Inu" or Japanese Akita, and the American Akita. The latter was developed in the US after the Second World War, and recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1955. Ironically, the USA is the only country not to recognize the Japanese and American strains as separate varieties of Akita, for show purposes.

Behaviour

Akitas are territorial, and guard their homesteads diligently. They have a cat-like tendency to wash their faces after eating, and to groom their canine companions. None of which stops them seeing off the real cats with a ferocious volley of woofs!

Varieties

Japanese Akita and American Akita.

Temperament

Akitas have a bold and protective temperament. They are devoted and protective of their human family, and initially suspicious of strangers. Early socialization will prevent this from becoming a problem. In terms of body language the Akita is particularly difficult to read, and may become aggressive to other dogs with no prior indication that they were in any way flustered or angry. This means they always need to be watched, and rigorous training is essential if the dog is to be trustworthy and manageable.

Health Problems

Health problems include canine hip dysplasia (CHD), luxating patella (dislocation of the kneecap), elbow dysplasia, autoimmune disease, cancer, bloat, eye diseases, epilepsy, and blood clotting disease.

Breed Details

  • Status: Common
  • Life Expectancy: 10 - 12 years
  • Weight: 92 - 146 lb
  • Height: 23 - 28"
  • Rare: No
  • Coat: Short
  • Grooming Requirements: Once a week
  • Town or Country: Either
  • Minimum Home Size: Large House
  • Minimum Garden Size: Large Garden
  • Breed Type: Companion Dog
  • Size: Large
  • Energy Level: High
  • Exercise Required: Over 2 hours

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