Australian Shepherd Dog

Breed Rating (1 Reviews)

Appearance
Friendliness
Hardiness
Garden

History

The Australian Shepherd, or "Aussie", was actually developed on ranches in the Western USA in the mid-19th century. It's ancestry before it arrived in the US is not known for sure, and the origin of its name and association with Australia is therefore a matter of debate.

There appears to be a lot of Border Collie in this breed, judging by appearances. The breed's popularity rose in the American West after World War II, and the dogs became popular through their ubiquitous appearance at rodeos and horse shows. They are great herders, and very hardy too.

Behaviour

This breed is fantastic at learning agility and other tricks, and is therefore a great show and competition dog.

Temperament

Australian Shepherds are outward-going, and easygoing too. They have loads of energy and love to use it up playing mentally stimulating games and running through the open air. They are great family dogs and love their families but are likely to form a special bond with their main 'handler'. If socialized and trained early, they will easily grow into calm and obedient dogs.

Health Problems

Australian Shepherds are sometimes afflicted by inherited blindness and deafness, spinal defects, cataracts, canine hip dysplasia (CHD), blood clotting disease, and epilepsy.

Breed Details

  • Status: Common
  • Life Expectancy: 12 - 18 years
  • Weight: 35 - 71 lb
  • Height: 18 - 23"
  • Rare: No
  • Coat: Medium
  • Grooming Requirements: More than once per week
  • Town or Country: Country
  • Minimum Home Size: Large House
  • Minimum Garden Size: Large Garden
  • Breed Type: Herding
  • Size: Large
  • Energy Level: High
  • Exercise Required: Over 2 hours

Your Pictures

Latest Reviews For Australian Shepherd Dog (1 of 1)

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Highly active and smart breed - Evelyn,

A wonderful and fun dog breed the Australian shepherd is not for someone who just wants to hang around the house and go for a leisurely walk. They need plenty of running, sport or agility to tire them out physically. And they also need a "job" to tire them out mentally - such as obedience, nose work and also agility. Highly intelligent they can develop an understanding of several words and signals. They are loyal and obedient (generally), but can be stubborn. The personalities can differ quite a bit from pup to pup. Some may be more shy and hesitant in new situations and others are more outgoing. Because of their energy level and exuberance they can be overwhelming for very young children.

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