Basset Fauve De Bretagne

History

The Basset Fauve de Bretagne The Basset Bleu de Gascogne is a French hunting dog. It was developed from the Grand Basset de Gascogne which has been around since the 15th century. After the French Revolution, commoners were allowed to go hunting, for the first time in French history, and the breed was developed for hunting on foot, rather than on horseback. This required a slower dog to track and hunt without leaving the hunters behind. The breed became very rare, but enthusiasts have brought it back from the brink of extinction. Basset Bleu de Gascognes are rarely seen outside France, though. It is recognized in the US by the United Kennel Club. It was cross bred with the Basset Griffon Vendeen and Wire Haired Dachshund to produce the breed we recognise today.

Behaviour

The Basset Fauve De Bretagne, often shortened to BFDB, and also known as the Fawn Bretagne Basset, is a loving family dog and an active hunting hound too. It gets on well with children, as well as other dogs and cats (if introduced to them when young). They are friendly with strangers usually, but give a handy warning bark if someone comes knocking at the door. They are lazy and sleep at home, but will always want to be involved in family fun. They don't like being left alone for too long or confined in a crate. They are custom-made for an active family that wants to go on plenty of walks, and is willing to include the dog in their daily activities.

Like other Bassets, the BFDB is a scent hound and loves being outdoors following a scent and exploring the world around them. Their great sense of smell is their main downfall, though, as they go 'deaf' once they are on the scent, and sometimes no amount of calling or shouting will bring them back. Their recall is actually very good in the home, though, and they do well on a long lead or in an enclosed outdoor area. But once off lead, their noses re totally in charge. Sadly, this means that one of the commonest causes of BFDB death is on the road. They become 'all scent and no sense', and will run into the road, ignoring any traffic. This does not mean they can be kept indoors, though - they need daily exercise to keep them fit and prevent obesity.

Training takes time, but is possible as long as you are firm, fair, and consistent. If you try to shout or use heavy-handed tactics, the dogs simply won't listen. So, training the BFDB requires patience and a good sense of humour - and lots of treats, as they are food-motivated. Basically, they are stubborn, being free thinkers who like to do things their own way. Consistency is the key.

Their coat is thick and wiry and requires stripping/clipping (pets) a few times a year to keep it looking neat, the hair around their eyes and ears should be trimmed more often. Brushing a couple of times a week will keep the coat tidy.

Like all Basset type breeds, some can develop back problems as they get old, but the BFDB is one of the hardiest of the group.

Temperament

Basset Fauve De Bretagnes are lively and inquisitive. Like all scent hounds they have tend to go ''deaf'' once their noses have picked up an interesting scent, so they need walking in an enclosed space, or on a long lead. They are cheerful dogs, good with families, and great companions around the house. Early socialization will bring out the best in them and help them develop into well rounded individuals.

Health Problems

Basset Fauve De Bretagnes can suffer more from cancer, heart disease, and kidney disease, than the average dog.

Breed Details

  • Status: Common
  • Life Expectancy: 11 - 14 years
  • Weight: 35 - 40 lb
  • Height: 13 - 15"
  • Rare: No
  • Coat: Medium
  • Grooming Requirements: More than once per week
  • Town or Country: Either
  • Minimum Home Size: Small House
  • Minimum Garden Size: Large Garden
  • Breed Type: Hound
  • Size: Medium
  • Energy Level: Medium
  • Exercise Required: Over 2 hours

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